Identity Posters

By: Will P.

This week The Holy Post will be discussing the identity poster, a project that all students in the upper school and lower school are doing. The identity poster is an activity where students express characteristics of their identity on a paper or poster. These identity posters will be hung in hallways and classrooms throughout the upper and lower schools. The staff of HTS have also created posters, which include traits like race, ethnicity, family life, political opinions, etc.

The purpose of the identity poster is to express personal characteristics, make connections and celebrate our differences. Connections between posters can help strengthen relationships and start new ones. Being able to relate to somebody on a personal level can help us get past differences. Acknowledging and celebrating our differences is also important. Being able to see that people are different from each other can help us work together on projects and in the classroom. The way that people think about us and the way that we think about ourselves is something that we need to examine. If people don’t see us the way that we see ourselves, then it’s hard for us to be ourselves.

The identity poster has been one of my favorite projects this year. It wasn’t graded, which gave me the freedom to be creative. Overall, I had a great time with it. I would strongly recommend doing this project with a family member. For example, I did this project with my father, and we had a great time. Thank you and I hope that you enjoyed this write-up for The Holy Post.

Sports and Spirituality

By: Helen M.

Basketball is one of many sports at Holy Trinity. It is definitely one of the most popular sports, too. Sports connect us to our Catholic faith in many ways. For example, basketball is a team sport. In basketball you win as a team and lose as a team. I play basketball, and it wouldn’t be as fun without a team. Your teammates cheer you on when you make a basket and support you when you make a mistake. That sounds a lot like our faith. Our faith teaches us to help others, not give up, and play fairly.

The Jesuit tradition that we believe focuses on reflection, examining our day or the preparing for the day to come. After a basketball game, we reflect on our mistakes, but more importantly we reflect on how we can improve: “In the day that I called, you answered me. You encouraged me with strength in my soul.” -Psalm 138:3

Imagining the Nativity

This Advent-Christmas season, third grade is practicing Ignatian contemplation in class. St. Iganatius encouraged his followers to contemplate scenes from Scripture as a way to engage both the mind and heart in prayer. Using their imaginations, third graders placed themselves in the Nativity scene and wrote the reflections below. As the Advent-Christmas season draws to a close with the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, we invite you to join our students in your own prayerful meditation on the Nativity and the fulfillment of the promise of Christ’s birth.
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“I am the ox, and I am present at the birth of Jesus. I see the Lord of all the people talking and the angels singing. I hear praises of joy and Mary and Joseph adoring the baby Jesus. I smell the incense from the candles and the hay in the manger. I feel the hay on my hoofs and lots of strong love.” -Jack

“I am a shepherd, and I am present at the birth of Jesus. I see Mary holding Jesus. I see some strange men. They are carrying gifts. I hear Jesus cooing and Mary softly humming to Jesus. I smell the air. It smells sweet and soft. I feel warm, calm, safe, and at peace.” -Lucia

“I am Mary, and I am present at the birth of Jesus. I see Joseph holding Jesus, and the animals are asleep. The wise men are walking in. I hear the soft rustle of the wind. I smell myrrh. I feel joy and the Holy Spirit” -Chloe

“Hi, I’m the angel. I’m also at the birth of Jesus. I see others watching the birth of Jesus. They look happy to see the Savior! I hear the baby crying and people are singing Amen! I smell animals that live there, like an ox. I also smell lovely spices. The birth of Jesus is exciting.” -Riley

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